MIT Summer Session

Muriel Cooper

MIT Summer Session announcements, 1985.

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  1. Image 1 — Cooper 05 (MIT Summer Session)

    Muriel Cooper, USA (1983)

    Muriel Cooper taught at the Museum School of Fine Arts, Simmons College, the Massachusetts College of Art, Boston University and the University of Maryland, as well as lecturing in institutions...

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    MIT Summer Session announcements, 1985.

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    Muriel Cooper, USA (1983)

      Muriel Cooper taught at the Museum School of Fine Arts, Simmons College, the Massachusetts College of Art, Boston University and the University of Maryland, as well as lecturing in institutions across America. In 1952, Cooper began working at MIT Press before founding the Office of Publications, which is now called Design Services. Cooper left MIT in 1958 to pursue a Fulbright scholarship in Milan. On her return in 1967, was became the first Design Director of MIT Press, where she designed hundreds of books such as Hans Wingler’s BAUHAUS (1969) and Robert Venturi’s Learning from Las Vegas (1972). In 1974 Cooper began teaching a course at MIT called ‘Messages and Means’ and was the first graphic designer to join the Department of Architecture in 1977. She later co-founded and directed MIT’s Visible Language Workshop at the Media Laboratory.

      Agencies

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      • MIT Media Lab

        1985 – 1994

      • MIT Visible Language Workshop

        1974 – 1985

      • Design Director at MIT Press

        1967 – 1974

      • Independent graphic studio

        1963 – 1967

      • Fulbright Scholarship in Milan

        1958 – 1963

      • Graphic designer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Office of Publications (later MIT Press)

        1952 – 1958