Edward Bawden, UK

AGI member since 1956

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Bawden studied at the RCA in the early 1920s. Was greatly infl uenced by the ideas of Paul Nash. He soon started to work for Curwen Press, making his prints in lithography or linocut. Became close friends with Eric Ravilious; they infl uenced each other strongly in their ways of using line and shape. Bawden had a versatile talent. He did book illustrations, murals and advertising material. He was made ‘an honorary member of AGI’ (which is not so unusual, considering the fact that the membership itself is a kind of honour). Henrion visited him once when he was about to print a large linocut. Edward had put the block on the fl oor on top of the special paper, and walked up and down across the lino to obtain a perfect print. He also taught at the RCA – David Gentleman, one of his students who became a friend, remembers him as an inspiring and friendly if exacting teacher. He continued printmaking and painting to the end of his long life and was working on a linocut on the day he died.

Edward Bawden studied at the RCA in the early 1920s. He was greatly influenced by the ideas of Paul Nash, and soon started to work for Curwen Press, making his prints in lithography or linocut. He became close friends with Eric Ravilious; they influenced each other strongly in their ways of using line and shape. Bawden had a versatile talent. He did book illustrations, murals and advertising material. He painted and also made copper engravings.

His work was typically English, with a sharp, introverted wit. His war sketchbooks were widely published in the UK and US. He was made ‘an honorary member of AGI’ (which is not so unusual, considering the fact that the membership itself is a kind of honour). Fellow AGI member FHK Henrion visited him once when he was about to print a large linocut. Bawden had put the block on the floor on top of the special paper, and walked up and down across the lino to obtain a perfect print. He also taught at the RCA: David Gentleman, one of his students who became a friend, remembers him as an inspiring and friendly, if exacting, teacher. He continued printmaking and painting to the end of his long life and was working on a linocut on the day he died.

Biography text taken from AGI by Ben and Elly Bos

Design work by Edward Bawden


    Edward Bawden, UK (1956)

    Edward Bawden studied at the RCA in the early 1920s. He was greatly influenced by the ideas of Paul Nash, and soon started to work for Curwen Press, making his...

    Read full biography
    Edward Bawden, UK (1956)

      Bawden studied at the RCA in the early 1920s. Was greatly infl uenced by the ideas of Paul Nash. He soon started to work for Curwen Press, making his prints in lithography or linocut. Became close friends with Eric Ravilious; they infl uenced each other strongly in their ways of using line and shape. Bawden had a versatile talent. He did book illustrations, murals and advertising material. He was made ‘an honorary member of AGI’ (which is not so unusual, considering the fact that the membership itself is a kind of honour). Henrion visited him once when he was about to print a large linocut. Edward had put the block on the fl oor on top of the special paper, and walked up and down across the lino to obtain a perfect print. He also taught at the RCA – David Gentleman, one of his students who became a friend, remembers him as an inspiring and friendly if exacting teacher. He continued printmaking and painting to the end of his long life and was working on a linocut on the day he died.

      Edward Bawden studied at the RCA in the early 1920s. He was greatly influenced by the ideas of Paul Nash, and soon started to work for Curwen Press, making his prints in lithography or linocut. He became close friends with Eric Ravilious; they influenced each other strongly in their ways of using line and shape. Bawden had a versatile talent. He did book illustrations, murals and advertising material. He painted and also made copper engravings.

      His work was typically English, with a sharp, introverted wit. His war sketchbooks were widely published in the UK and US. He was made ‘an honorary member of AGI’ (which is not so unusual, considering the fact that the membership itself is a kind of honour). Fellow AGI member FHK Henrion visited him once when he was about to print a large linocut. Bawden had put the block on the floor on top of the special paper, and walked up and down across the lino to obtain a perfect print. He also taught at the RCA: David Gentleman, one of his students who became a friend, remembers him as an inspiring and friendly, if exacting, teacher. He continued printmaking and painting to the end of his long life and was working on a linocut on the day he died.

      Biography text taken from AGI by Ben and Elly Bos